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Focus

Posted by on Nov 22, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Focus

              The book ‘Inner Game of Tennis’ by Timothy Galwey, offers the idea that there are two selves in our body. One which is useful for ‘thinking’, and the other for ‘doing’. His experiments revealed that by resting his thinking mind whilst he was taking action, he got more of what he wanted. A fixed focus lens on a mobile phone will capture anything we point it at, but with no variation in the depth of field. Variable focus lenses require more attention and effort, but can deliver...

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A Soft Revolution

Posted by on Nov 21, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

A Soft Revolution

              I worked as a consultant to BBC Television during the mid-1990’s on a long term project to explore and establish new ways of making programmes. To frame it, we coined the term ‘The Digital Revolution’. It was a great experience, not only because it brought me into contact with the many very talented and bright staff who made great tv, but also because it was a voyage of transformation that genuinely moved people. When the project began there was a disconnection between...

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Contentment

Posted by on Nov 20, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Contentment

              Whilst eating juicy apples in the wonderful surroundings of the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve struck on the idea that the world was not perfect. Their problem was that they discovered desire, and wanted things to be other than they manifestly were. The recognition of a world that appears to fall short of an ideal has bothered humanity ever since, and required various enlightened beings to advise us to keep it simple. The solution according to the Buddhism, Islam, Judaism and many more, is to let...

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Water, Plain and Simple

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in III | 0 comments

Water, Plain and Simple

              “I study the future,” says a smiling Adil Najam, a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, “and we know enough to begin implementing a whole range of ‘no regret policies’ that is, guidelines that will definitely improve the situation, and equally, won’t make matters worse. We have some challenges ahead if we’re to successfully tackle the causes of rising sea-levels, drought and hurricanes; these climactic problems are already creating social insecurities. For...

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The Rose Bowl

Posted by on Feb 14, 2013 in III | 0 comments

The Rose Bowl

  Ancient and modern philosophies teach that light, laughter and love each enable one to transcend difficulty. The light refers to knowledge and to wisdom derived from undeniable facts, gained either directly through one’s own experience, or indirectly through study, observation and concentration. The symbol of the hermit, illustrated on the Tarot card, represents the wise man, who carries a lantern which gives just enough light to illuminate his next step, and thus finds sufficient knowledge to move forward. Laughter, as we all know,...

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The flash crash of 2:45

Posted by on Feb 14, 2013 in I | 0 comments

The flash crash of 2:45

  Over 70% of the US stock market is now traded by algorithms; mathematical formulae that talk to one another to optimize financial transactions. Two thousand physicists are employed on Wall Street to support this Black Box trading (aka algo trading) and yet in 2010 something happened that no-one could control. In just five minutes, 9% of the value of the stock market ‘dissappeared’ in what’s known as the flash crash of 2:45. Algorithms are so dominant, that their interactions can’t be read or controlled, other than by a big red...

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Barefoot nursing

Posted by on Feb 14, 2013 in I | 0 comments

Barefoot nursing

              When Gandhi’s ten year old son suffered an attack of typhoid, he wrapped the child’s body in a wet cloth and dry blankets despite the patient’s protests. He understood what modern medicine now acknowledges: that the high temperature of a fever prevents a virus from multiplying, and thus contains the outbreak. It took 40 days of consistent care for the illness to pass, and it ended with the complete recovery of the boy. Gandhi’s approach to medicine was resolutely that of the barefoot doctor:...

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Land Grab

Posted by on Jun 1, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Land Grab

              The World Health Organization defines food security, as the consistent economic and physical access to a sufficient quantity of food and fresh water, together with the knowledge of how to use it. Because of the changing dynamics of global food supply, this equation works out very differently, if you happen to be a wealthy, perhaps overweight citizen of the developed world, rather than an undernourished subsistence farmer in the the third world. Developing countries need to be able to feed...

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Insults

Posted by on Apr 9, 2012 in II | 0 comments

Insults

  Andouille is a spiced sausage made from the stomach and large intestine of a pig. It’s also a term of insult in France, and roughly translates as “imbecile”; which medically speaking is halfway between “idiot” (IQ of 0-25), and “moron” (IQ of 51-70). Insulting, as an art form, reached a point of sophistication in the Elizabethan era, when Shakespeare detailed seven degrees of verbal offence ranging from the elegant ‘polite retort’, through to a ‘direct lie’, via the ‘reproof valiant’. A good example of the...

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I sing the body electric

Posted by on Mar 21, 2012 in II | 0 comments

I sing the body electric

At Walt Whitman’s death, it was reported that over a thousand mourners visited his coffin within the first three hours. During his life, the frank expressions of love for the body in his poetry – particularly in the collection Leaves of Grass – caused outrage amongst some, not least for it’s ebullient sexuality. The self publication of Leaves of Grass moved Ralph Waldo Emerson to send a letter praising the work and it’s clear that Whitman, Emerson and also their contemporary Henry David Thoreau all shared similar...

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